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Badgers all around!

By Taylor Wildlife, Nov 1 2019 05:00PM

Autumn is the perfect time of year to carrying out badger surveys. As the long, lush summer vegetation dies back and fields are harvested, badger signs such as paths and latrines become far more visible.


Later in the winter, badger activity will decrease, but for now badgers are busy excavating their setts, gathering bedding such as dried grass and leaves, and foraging for food. Badgers do not hibernate, but they do reduce their activity over winter, so it's important that they put on enough fat reserves to last until spring.


On this week's surveys, badger signs were abundant.




A freshly excavated sett (clipboard for scale)
A freshly excavated sett (clipboard for scale)

Badger path through an arable field
Badger path through an arable field

Badger footprint
Badger footprint


Badger guard hairs on lowered section of stone wall
Badger guard hairs on lowered section of stone wall

Badger surveys may be carried out as part of an extended Phase 1 survey, or as a standalone survey. If badgers are found to be damaging property (e.g. undermining a road or causing extensive crop damage) or preventing development, it may be necessary to exclude badgers from their sett. This activity must be licenced by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), and an Ecological Clerk of Works should be present for any activity which requires a licence. It is a crime to interfere with or obstruct a sett in any way.


If you think you have badgers on your property and would like a survey or advice on mitigation, contact us and find out how we can help.





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